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Virtual Programs

Available Virtual Resources

  • Hudson River Start to Finish (all ages) - Use these videos of our Estuary Model to teach your students estuarine literacy, including geography, basic brackish water information, and pollution and human impacts.
    • Round out your lesson by using these prepared curriculum guides: a vocabulary list, student worksheets, and activities your students can do at home or in the classroom
    • Spanish translations of the videos and resources are also available 
    • Option to add on a virtual field trip program for 20-45 minutes; contact cedsall@sarahlawrence.edu for more information
  • Water Quality Testing (high school) - Use these videos of hands-on water quality testing to teach your students about the different parameters scientists test for and why they can be useful to track
    • Enhance your lesson by using these prepared curriculum guides, including a worksheet for student use, as well as a lab on data analysis and graphing literacy
    • Option to add on a virtual field trip program for 20-45 minutes; contact cedsall@sarahlawrence.edu for more information

 Other Virtual Field Trip Options 

  • Hudson River Food Web (3rd grade and up, 45 minutes)
    • Learn about some organisms that live in the Hudson River, how scientists categorize them, and how they interact with each other
  • Animal Adaptations (3rd grade and up, 45 minutes)
    • Learn about some of the animals that live in and on the Hudson River, and how they’ve evolved adaptations over time to help them survive. We will showcase both living and preserved specimens on camera to review with your students
  • Fish Identification (4th grade and up, 45 minutes)
    • Learn about fish anatomy and the way scientists use that knowledge to help identify different species that we find in the river. Work with an educator to identify some species in real time! 
  • Solving Water Quality Puzzles with Data Literacy  (high school, 45 minutes)
    • Learn about water quality testing on the Hudson River, and how scientists use real data to tell stories and solve puzzles about changes that we’re seeing in the River